09 July, 2009

L’Oréal’s policy on animal testing.







I recently mentioned something about the new 'Pure Active' range on one of my videos recently and got a comment from one of my views saying something about how it was too bad that L'Oreal tested on animals.

I never noticed the comment on my video until I was made aware of it by Naomi from Immediate PR who informed me that L'Oreal DO NOT test on animals, and that of course, people saying otherwise is bad press. I absolutely agree with her on that - She also sent me a document with all of the details, so I thought I would post them here for those of you that are interested and that have always thought that L'Oreal test on animals.

Well, great news! They Don't!

Here is the document I was sent :


Summary

L’Oréal voluntarily stopped animal testing on its entire range of products in 1989.
We are totally committed to a future without tests on animals and continue to make significant investments in research aimed at finding valid alternatives. We comply with all EU and national laws in ensuring the absolute safety of our products. These are positions we share with The Body Shop, whose policy of not using any ingredients that have been tested or retested on animals for cosmetics purposes since the end of 1990 remains unchanged.

L’Oréal voluntarily stopped using animal testing for the evaluation of its entire range of finished cosmetic products in 1989. It was possible to do this due to the considerable time and effort we have invested for over two decades including developments of databases on ingredient toxicity profiles, and the results of a large-scale programme carried out over several years to develop appropriate in vitro methods such as Episkin. Moreover, we have also co-operated with our competitors in this common objective.

We are totally committed to a future without tests on animals. We comply with all EU and national laws in ensuring the absolute safety of our products. These are positions we share with The Body Shop whose policy of not using any ingredients that have been tested or retested on animals for cosmetics purposes since the end of 1990 remains unchanged.

The industry and many opinion formers believe that this common objective of eradication of animal testing for safety purposes can only be totally achieved through research, development and validation of alternative methods and approaches. L’Oréal has invested more than any other company in this endeavour during the last 25 years. This is a fact that was recognised and endorsed by Anita Roddick, the founder of The Body Shop and campaigner against animal testing for cosmetics.

Some of our achievements to date:

· In the early 1980s, L’Oréal developed Episkin - reconstructed human skin models complete with a barrier function. These have since been routinely used to obtain a better understanding of the biological mechanisms of skin and to evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of our products. Some of these models can be used to study skin pigmentation or its immune response.

· A specific protocol, using the company’s reconstructed epidermis model Episkin, has been validated by the European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) for the purposes of evaluating skin irritancy and corrosion. This method provides a full replacement for the corresponding animal test.

· Our researchers have also developed the first epidermal model containing Langerhans cells which play a decisive role in the skin’s allergic response. Having been a pilot for a European Commission programme, similar models are currently being studied as alternative methods to skin allergy tests.

· The recent acquisition by L’Oréal of the tissue engineering company, Skin Ethic, is further testimony to our continued commitment to the development of alternative methods to replace animal testing.



In Europe, the safety of cosmetic products is regulated by the European Cosmetics Directive, which is implemented in the UK by the Cosmetic Products (Safety) Regulations. This legislation specifically prescribes the tests that all ingredient suppliers must carry out on every chemical substance, whether old or new. Some of these tests may have involved animals. Companies manufacturing products containing chemical substances, without any exception, are only legally permitted to use ingredients that have undergone these compulsory safety tests at some stage.

However, the Seventh Amendment of the EU Cosmetics Directive states that in March 2009 all testing on all cosmetic ingredients will be banned by law across the whole of the EU and any cosmetic product containing ingredients tested on animals will be banned from being placed on the market. Only a limited amount of tests assessing the systemic safety of ingredients will be exempt from this ban, but the exemption only applies for an extra 4 years. In other words, after 2013 products containing ingredients tested on animals will be banned from sale. We continue to work with the Commission, the industry and research organisations to develop, ahead of the above cut-off dates, new alternative methods and approaches in several fields of toxicology where they are still lacking.

Despite the progress made to date, the Commission, the industry and research organisations face the major challenge of developing new alternative methods and approaches for the safety assessment of chemical ingredients in several fields of toxicology where they are still lacking, and ensuring their validation and acceptance by competent authorities. L’Oréal is thus an active member of the European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to animal testing (EPAA) led by the European Commission, and we are committed, in our field of expertise, to progressing and promoting this programme.



9 comments:

  1. Thats actually cleared up a lot - I was wondering about this, as there has been a lot of talk about this on the blogs/twitter...

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  2. wow thats really interesting well done to L'oreal for putting the record straight

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  3. This is really good news for me as I was also under the impression that L'Oreal tested on animals. I'm glad to know otherwise.

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  4. There is still a grey area regarding L'oreal... they claim they do not test their *finished* products on animals, but don't say anything about the ingredients they use. I'm still boycotting them.

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  5. They don't test the finished product, but as there PR letter says, they DO TEST ON SOME OF THE INGREDIENTS ON ANIMALS. Which means they DO test on animals at least while they are choosing to use those ingredients. There are LOTS of other companies out there that don't test at all. You can check out PETA's companies that do not test on animals list.

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  6. They test their ingredients on animals, in fact they are one of the worst animal testing companies around, their statement is simple PR BS.

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  7. They state they don't test their FINISHED products on animals, whilst hiding behind the body shop aspect, which don't test basic ingredients on animals. So I still refuse to buy their products as well as the body shop. I think it's extremely sad that the Body Shop is now owned by a heartless company who are trying to make themselves look caring and fool people who have a conscience. Makes me sick.

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  8. I'm here as a newbie following up searches about L'oreal & animal testing and also find it hard to side with a company that has lead the market in animal cruelty for asthetic purposes.

    If anyone can find a press release that states, for whatever reason that there are, or are not animals currently kept on site or on commisioned sites, then that I'm sure would go some way to evidence their statement to find alternative testing methods - which in turn would be sadly twisted truth, as they'll need to be working towards the 2013 deadline, equating to a matter of their 'good intentions actually being enforcement rather than voluntary or ethical corporate commitment.

    Many thanks for the blog and best wishes from a new brand watcher xx

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  9. Thank you so much for this! X

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